UNICEF: Majority of global child deaths caused by contaminated water

 

In this March 12, 2013 photo, a Filipino girl watches at a makeshift water station in suburban Pasay, south of Manila, Philippines. Ninety-one percent of people living in Asia have improved access to clean water, a remarkable achievement over the last two decades in the world's most populous region. But its richest countries and wealthiest citizens likely have better water supplies and governments better prepared for natural disasters. - (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
In this March 12, 2013 photo, a Filipino girl watches at a makeshift water station in suburban Pasay, south of Manila, Philippines. Ninety-one percent of people living in Asia have improved access to clean water, a remarkable achievement over the last two decades in the world’s most populous region. But its richest countries and wealthiest citizens likely have better water supplies and governments better prepared for natural disasters. – (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)


Today, 22 March, is World Water Day and some of you may think that lack of water could cause problems to the agriculture and therefore the economy. But UNICEF is here to remind us, or even to inform us, that there are some very dangerous and in some cases fatal aspects of water scarcity and water contamination. This is achieved via the release of a report regarding the child deaths by contaminated water at a global level.

The reported deaths in 2011 reached 760,000, down from 1.2 million per year in 2000. But that is still too many, UNICEF says, which is why it is urging governments, civil society and ordinary citizens to remember that behind the numbers are the faces of children. Globally, an estimated 2,000 children under the age of five die every day from diarrhoeal diseases and of these some 1,800 deaths are linked to water, sanitation and hygiene.

The following must-see video is about Sabine Dolan, a  UNICEF correspondent, who reports on a simple solution to the problems caused by contaminated water in Peru’s flood-affected Loreto region.

After all, to protect water is to protect children. 

One thought on “UNICEF: Majority of global child deaths caused by contaminated water

  1. Pingback: The global water crisis | energment

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