USA: One step closer to the first offshore wind farm

usaIt is under consideration for 12 years amiding doubts about its funding, concerns about the impact on the environment and barriers by representatives of the oil industry, but the first marine wind farm in the United States are now closer than ever to be constructed, as greater Japanese bank agreed to provide funds for the construction. The bank Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ announced this week that it will provide a “significant amount” of debt capital for the development and construction of the Cape Wind, which will consist of 130 wind turbines 3,6 MW each . The responsible manager, Takaaki Sakai, said the bank is impressed by the perseverance of the leaders of the project.
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Earth Hour: was the message received?

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As almost everyone know on the evening of Saturday, March 23, people around the world were asked by campaigners to switch off the lights for an hour to observe “Earth Hour”. Professor Bjorn Lomborg says this gesture will do little to help the planet, and gives people the wrong impression about how to address climate issues.
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UNICEF: Majority of global child deaths caused by contaminated water

 

In this March 12, 2013 photo, a Filipino girl watches at a makeshift water station in suburban Pasay, south of Manila, Philippines. Ninety-one percent of people living in Asia have improved access to clean water, a remarkable achievement over the last two decades in the world's most populous region. But its richest countries and wealthiest citizens likely have better water supplies and governments better prepared for natural disasters. - (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
In this March 12, 2013 photo, a Filipino girl watches at a makeshift water station in suburban Pasay, south of Manila, Philippines. Ninety-one percent of people living in Asia have improved access to clean water, a remarkable achievement over the last two decades in the world’s most populous region. But its richest countries and wealthiest citizens likely have better water supplies and governments better prepared for natural disasters. – (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)


Today, 22 March, is World Water Day and some of you may think that lack of water could cause problems to the agriculture and therefore the economy. But UNICEF is here to remind us, or even to inform us, that there are some very dangerous and in some cases fatal aspects of water scarcity and water contamination. This is achieved via the release of a report regarding the child deaths by contaminated water at a global level.
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